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Video Transcript
Haley

Oh, hey! Rob, look who’s here.

Rob

I figured you’d be getting outfitted with gear, too. You need a hand? Well, you came to the right spot. Come on. The staff at archery shops like this can help match us with the right setup for our skills and the game we’re after. Bowhunting friends, local archery clubs, and archery websites can also help point you in the right direction. Let’s get started with the main tool in hunting with a bow and arrow: the bow. What’s your flavor? Yeah, the choices can be a little bit overwhelming. So let’s break it down into the three main types of bows: traditional bows, compound bows, crossbows. Traditional—few people bowhunt with a stick and string any more. But some archers like traditional-style bows, like longbows and recurves, because they are challenging and fun. There’s a few things that might help you decide if a traditional bow like this is right for you. First is knowing that many states have minimum draw weight requirements for big game.

On screen: For example, this bow can’t be used in hunting. The draw weight is too light.

Rob

So depending on how strong you are, you might be limited to the type of game you can hunt with a traditional bow.

On screen: Check state laws for the species you are hunting. A graph shows that lighter draw weight is needed for smaller game, such as turkeys, and heavier draw weight is needed for larger game, such as elk.

Rob

And keep in mind that for the safety of the bow and yourself, always use a bow stringer to avoid injury or damage.

Haley

Crossbows—these crossbows look pretty awesome, don’t they?

Rob

With a scope and a trigger, they take the drawing and holding the bowstring out of the equation, which can allow some people with physical limitations to still enjoy hunting. But check your state’s hunting regulations if you decide to use a crossbow.

Haley

Compound bows—depending on what, where, and how you’re hunting, most people choose a compound bow because of these advantages.

Rob

It’s easier to hold at full draw because of the mechanical advantage. And that makes it easier to aim. It converts more of the bow’s energy into arrow velocity—that means speed. That increased arrow velocity converts into flatter arrow flight and increased penetration and accuracy. Its shorter overall length makes it easier to shoot in tight places, such as a tree stand or blind. Their many accessories make them easier to shoot more accurately in a shorter time.

Haley

With all the different designs, let-offs, cams, lengths, you name it, compound technology can get pretty intense. And these archery shop experts, they can help you select what’s best for you and what you intend to hunt.

The person behind the camera selects a bow.

Rob

Nice choice. That looks just like Haley’s bow. But don’t you think it looks a little bit naked? I mean, there’s a few more things you need to be able to shoot it. We should consider a sighting system, release aid, arrow rest, arrow quiver, a peep sight. All right. Sight, release, rest, and quiver—we forgot the other half of the bow and arrow. No problem. Your pro shop will match your bow with the right arrow type, fletching, length, weight, spine. Let’s consider the last characteristic—spine. It’s hard to see, but when you shoot an arrow, there’s so much energy converted from the bow into launching the arrow that it actually flexes the arrow shaft as it leaves the bow. And depending on the spine of your arrow, you get more or less flex. And getting it right is key. It’s called the archer’s paradox.

A slow-motion video shows the arrow shaft flexing after being released from the bow.

Rob

You want to go bowhunting, right? We got our license. We got our bow and arrows. But that’s not what actually kills big game. You see, an arrow all by itself won’t do the job. It’s the sharp broadhead on the end that allows you to harvest big game. Your bow and arrow delivers the broadhead to your target. So it’s really important that you match your broadhead to your bow, arrows, and the type of game you’re hunting. But here are some basic guidelines. Fixed broadheads don’t require assembly with replaceable blades. They’re one solid piece. Depending on the game, modular broadheads with replaceable blades that you assemble on a fixed shaft offer lots of good options. Expandable or mechanical broadheads deploy the blades on impact. How cool is that? And broadheads kill by blood loss—lots of it. So be sure any time you hunt, you use razor-sharp blades. And when you are changing the broadheads, use a broadhead wrench.

The cameraman starts to leave the archery shop with his new gear.

Rob

Rob: Whoa, whoa, whoa. What about your gear insurance? You just spent all your hard-earned cash on that sweet setup. You don’t want to throw it into your ride unprotected. Get yourself a quality case that will protect your bowhunting investment: your bow, your arrows, the works. It’s safer for your gear and yourself.

Haley

Now we’re ready to get out there and practice. Let’s go.